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Annie Carrie Fuld
February 17th 1874 - January 16th 1939
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Annie Carrie Fuld

Annie Carrie Fuld was William's wife. She had only one U.S. patent in her name and this one's a doozy. It's a calculator game that after reading the patent we were left pretty impressed. William's name is nowhere to be found on this patent so it is likely this one is all Annie. According to the patent, it is intended to get children interested and excited about arithmetic. Now that's a hefty claim. We wish some of these would turn up as we have never been interested or excited about math! William would manufacture and call this game U.C. Billies Calculator. We do know that Annie didn't have too much faith in the toy and game business. According to Hubert Fuld his mother Annie didn't let his father William quit his job as a Custom's Inspector for twenty-eight years though much of his living was made from the toy business. She was practical, and you can tell by her picture she didn't joke around much.

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Annie Carrie Fuld
Patent No. 663,336

U.S. Patents
Patent No. 663,336
December 4th 1900

Though William's wife Annie didn't care very much for the toy and game business, she did invent a learning game which sole purpose was to teach children arithmetic and get them interested in math. William would use his trademark on Did U.C. Billie? To call this game Did U.C. Billie Calculator. The registration reads “Be in known that I, Annie Carrie Fuld, a citizen of the United States, residing at Baltimore, in the State of Maryland, have invented new and useful Improvements in Game-Boards, of which the following is a specification. My invention relates to game-boards, and has for its object to provide an improved game-board which will combine instruction with amusement. By the use of my improved board the fundamental operations of arithmetic can be readily and accurately performed. Its operation is so simple and fascinating that any child can quickly master it and will become interested therein and be both instructed and amused by using it.”