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Isaac Fuld
March 18th 1865 - November 18th 1939
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Isaac Fuld

Isaac Fuld became famous for his Oriole talking board and family feud with his brother William. Though Isaac and William used the Ouija board against each other, Isaac made many other toys and had one non-Ouija U.S. patent and one non-Ouija trademark in his name. Isaac like his brother also made pool and billiard tables. His first patent was registered on June 15th 1909 and his trademark was registered on May 14th 1912. Isaac put all his toys under the Oriole trademark which he would later need to expand. Isaac began making toys in 1904. His grandson Stuart remembers seeing his small pool tables and other toys as a child, but they have long since disappeared. If you have a toy that bears Isaac Fuld's name or the Southern Toy Company's please contact us and let us know. Isaac's toys were not made and distributed to the same degree as William's toys and thus are much harder to come by.


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Isaac Fuld
Patent No. 924,978

U.S. Patents
Patent No. 924,978
June 15th 1909

Isaac Fuld had only registered one patent. Though most well known for his Ouija and Oriole association he also made pool tables. Like his brother William, Isaac believed there was a better way to retrieve pool balls once they were knocked into its pockets. The result was this patent. It reads “My invention relates to certain new and useful improvements in billiard tables of that class in which pockets are provided into which the balls are to be discovered. In the type of billiard tables referred to ball conduits are downwardly inclined from the pockets to the locality where the balls are to be finally assembled. This construction renders it necessary to provide considerable space for such conduits, and in order to conceal them from view the sides and ends of the table must be correspondingly deep. My invention has for its object to provide means for promptly delivering the balls, which shall avoid the necessity of the general incline of the receiving conduits and which may be conveniently and removably disposed beneath the side and end rails of the table and afford ready access to the balls. With these ends in view my invention consists in the details of construction and arrangement hereinafter set forth.”

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Isaac Fuld
Trademark No. 86,526

U.S. Trademarks
Trademark No. 86,526
May 14th 1912

When Isaac registered this Oriole trademark, he assumed it would cover his popular Oriole talking boards. Unfortunately for him, it was pointed out in court with his brother that it didn't and he was forced to register one specifically for talking boards. The mark is strikingly similar to the early Ouija crests, and thus William felt this corroborated his claim that Oriole boards were an exact copy of the Ouija board. The registration reads “Be it known that I, Isaac Fuld, a citizen of the Unites States of America, residing at Baltimore, in the State of Maryland, and doing business at 2002 Cromwell street, in said city, have heretofore adopted and used the trade-mark shown in the accompanying drawing. The trade-mark has been continuously used in my business since December 1904. The class of this merchandise to which the trade-mark is appropriated is class No. 22, Games, toys, and sporting goods, and the particular description of goods comprised in said class upon which said trade-mark is sued, is toy pool tables. The trade-mark is applied or affixed to the goods, or to the packages containing the same, by stenciling the same on the tables or on the boxes in which they are packed.”