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Patents and Trademarks
William Fuld | Carrie Fuld | William A Fuld | Isaac Fuld

Carrie Anne Fuld
May 14th 1892 - June 1st 1953

Carrie was William Fuld's oldest child. Though she was a musical prodigy, he wanted to leave his children the Ouija legacy and figured he could do that by assigning patents and trademarks to them. Such is the case with Carrie. William assigned two patents to Carrie a U.S. patent and a Canadian patent. They are basically the same patent for two different countries. These patents are extremely important because William used these to maintain the belief that his Ouija boards were still legally patented thus scaring away competition. The original Bond patent expired on February 10, 1908, and these new patents were actually only improvements to the class. Isaac Fuld pointed this fact out during this last court fight with his brother in 1919. We can see from the design of the board and planchette that William used his Oracle board as a model.

U.S. Patents
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William Fuld
Patent No. 1,125,833

Patent No. 1,125,833
January 19th 1915

William used his second talking board patent to firm up his Ouija business, and he used this patent to warn his brother Isaac and all those who manufactured faux Ouija boards that he would use any legal means at his disposal to put them out of business. William assigned this patent to his first child Carrie Fuld. “My invention relates to an improvement to talking boards, and particularly the class of boards known as the ouija boards, and the object of the invention is to produce a game in which two or more persons can amuse themselves by asking questions of any kind and having them answered by the device used and operated by the touch of the hand, so that the answers are designated by letters on the board. A further object is the provision of the means whereby the letters, numerals, and symbols can be readily observed by the players of operators as the device is moved about the board.”

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William Fuld
Patent No. 165,774

Canadian Patents
Patent No. 165,774
November 2nd 1915

Like the U.S. version William filed this patent to ward off competition and protect his Ouija board though this time in Canada. While the Copp Clark company in Canada continued to make Ouija boards under their original agreement with the International Novelty Company William registered this patent to stop any trend from forming and protect the improvements noted below. He assigned this patent to his first child Carrie Fuld. The drawing attached to the patent is the design for William's Oracle board. “My invention relates to an improvement in Talking-Boards and particularly in that class of boards known as the Ouija Boards, and the object of the invention is to produce a game with which two or more persons can amuse themselves by asking questions of any kind and having them answered by the device used and operated by the touch of the hand, so that the answers are designated by letters on the board. A further object is the provision of the means whereby the letters, numerals, and symbols can be readily observed by the players of operators as the device is moved about the board.”