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Paul Ambrose Fuld
January 19th 1899 - November 6th 1988
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Paul Ambrose Fuld

Though the Fuld family business would not be Paul's fate and although he didn't have any Ouija registrations in his name, he did register two non-Ouija U.S. patents. It's hard to deny what's in your blood and as a Fuld, Paul had some inventions up his sleeve. His first patent was registered with his brother William Andrew on January 6th 1925 and his last patent was registered on October 23th 1945. Noticeably both of these registration contain the use of wheels. He also submitted a trademark for registration which he filed November 16th 1945 but for some reason it was never completed. Perhaps the mark was already taken, or he lost interest during the waiting period. To date we aren't sure if either of Paul's inventions were ever produced. Do you have an example of Paul's tire tool or his trundle toy? If so please contact us and let us know.

 

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Paul Ambrose Fuld
William Andrew Fuld
Patent No. 1,521,677

U.S. Patents
Patent No. 1,521,677
January 6th 1925

Not many people can claim patent or trademark registrations as their own, and even fewer have the opportunity to register a patent with his brother. This patent on a tire tool was registered by William Andrew and Paul Ambrose Fuld. It reads “Be it known that we, William A. Fuld and Paul A. Fuld, citizens of the United States, residing in the city of Baltimore and State of Maryland, have invented certain new and useful Improvements in Tire Tools, of which the following is a specification. The invention relates to devices for preventing the revolution of a jacked up wheel while the fastenings for a demountable rim are being manipulated, and has as an object the provision of a device which may be placed upon the tire when the wheel is jacked up to prevent awkward movements of the wheel while the fastenings for the demountable rim are being removed or replaced. A further object of the invention is the provision of a device of the class referred to which has a minimum of parts, and therefore is incapable of getting out of order.”

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Paul Ambrose Fuld
Patent No. 2,387,507

Patent No. 2,387,507
October 23rd 1945

Paul's only solo patent is for a trundle toy which is part transformer. The registration reads “The invention relates to toys and has an object the provision of a child's toy having an attractive changeable appearance when pushed along a floor and having means operated by the floor engaging wheels to produce sounds. Further objects will appear from the following description when read in connection with the accompanying drawing showing an illustrative embodiment of the invention wherein...A trundle toy comprising, in combination: a trundle wheel; a pin carried by said wheel adjacent its periphery and extending in parallel with the axis of rotation of the wheel; an annular ring member loosely supported on said pin, the radial thickness thereof being less than the spacing of its pin support from the tread of the wheel; whereby the ring may be thrown to positions radially outward of the tread of the wheel by centrifugal force and to a position radially inward of the tread by contact with the ground; and means to retain the ring on its supporting pin.”

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Paul Ambrose Fuld
Trademark Serial No. 491,711

U.S. Trademark
Trademark Serial No. 491,711
November 16th 1945

This trademark was filed but never registered. It was for Paul's “push and pull wheel trundle toys” listed above. We can only guess that the mark was already registered by someone else, or Paul had second thought on even producing the item. Thank goodness he filed it or we wouldn't even know it existed.